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KOREAN DANCES for Wind Orchestra by CHANG SU KOH (Japan, 1970)

[#33] March 9, 2020

1987 | Wind Orchestra | Grade 5 | 10’ – 15’ | Dance Suite


Chang Su Koh

Chang Su Koh’s Korean Dances for Wind Orchestra is our Composition of the Week.


This dance suite has three movements, Preludio, Passacaglia and Rondo-Finale, and was commissioned by Osaka College of Music.


Chang Su Koh uses several traditional Korean rhythms called Chirche Chandan. The first movement, Preludio, is a kind of marching overture. The second movement, Passacaglia, is a series of variations on the traditional tune Birds and Moon. The third movement, Rondo-Finale, uses the form of Chirche Chandan in a freely structured way.


Chirche Chandan is a very unique and complex rhythm style in the Korean Peninsula.

Korean Dances has a duration of around 15 minutes, uses a standard concert band instrumentation, and it is intended for college/university level. The music is available at Bravo Music.


Chang Su Koh was born in Osaka in 1970. After graduating Osaka College of Music with a degree in composition, he entered the Musik Akademie der Stadt Basel. Koh has studied composition with Kunihiko Tanaka and Rudolf Kelterborn, and conducting with Jost Meyer to date. He received the 2nd prize from the 5th Suita Music Contest composition section and earned honorable mentions from the 13th Nagoya City Cultural Promotion Contest and the 1st Zoltán Kodály Memorial International Composers Competition.


He was also awarded the 12th Asahi Composition prize (“Lament” was a 2002 AJBC test piece) and received the “Master Yves Leleu” prize from the 1st Comines-Warneton International Composition Contest. Presently, he teaches at Osaka College of Music and ESA Conservatory of Music and Wind Instrument Repair Academy, and is also a member of Kansai Modern Music Association. He composes and arranges orchestral, wind and chamber music with commissions from various bands. He also directs amateur orchestras and city bands.


 

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